Innocent Spouse Tax Relief Changes – New Rules

When you file a joint tax return, you are responsible, along with your spouse, for the information in the return.  If it turns out that your spouse under-reported his or her income, or claimed deductions or credits without being entitled to them, you might be liable for the resulting taxes, penalties and interest — just as your spouse is.

There are some instances in which you might find tax relief, however.  The IRS, with a new rules regarding innocent spouse tax relief, is making it a little easier to get free of your spouse’s tax debt.  If you want “equitable relief” there is no longer a two-year limit for applying.  And, if you have been turned down because of being outside this limit, you can reapply under the new rule.  But, in order to take advantage of this rule, you have to be an “innocent spouse.”Continue Reading

What Are You Doing with Your Payroll Tax Cut?

At the end of last year, Congress hurried through a tax package.

One of the credits that was allowed to expire was the Making Work Pay tax credit.  However, our representatives replaced the Making Work Pay tax credit with a reduction in the payroll tax paid by employees. This means that you should be seeing a paycheck that is a little bit bigger.

Our leaders, of course, want you to go out and spend that money, pumping it back into the economy.  The whole point of tax cuts is to encourage you to spend so that we can keep the economy, which relies a great deal on consumer spending, moving in a direction of positive growth.  However tempting it might be to spend that extra money, though, it is a good idea to consider how that money can help you down the road.
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5 Things You Should Know About Filing a Tax Extension

Tax Day seems to be suddenly staring you in the face.

You’ve known for a while that it’s been coming, but it still takes you by surprise.

If you can’t seem to track down the documentation that you need, or if you are uncertain that you will be able to file by Tax Day (April 17 in 2012), you may want to file for an extension.

Just about anyone can file for an extension using Form 4868.  You can even file this form electronically.  It’s convenient, and you get an extra six months to prepare your tax return.

However, it is important to note that it’s not as simple as filing some paperwork.

Here are some things you should know about filing a tax extension:
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Tax Year 2010: Time to Begin Repaying the 2008 First-Time Homebuyer Tax Credit

Here in America, we view the housing market as one of the main pillars of the economy.  As a result, when the real estate market moves slowly, our leaders are concerned about what could happen to the economy.  This was a big concern in late 2007 and early 2008 as signs of a housing meltdown really began manifesting.  Even before the financial crisis, leaders were trying to prevent a real estate market collapse, and they began offering a first-time homebuyer tax credit to encourage citizens to buy homes.

Homebuyer Tax Credit 2008: Not a True Tax Credit

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IRS Tax Credits and Deductions to Save on Your Taxes if You Have Kids

These child tax credits and deductions can mean a tax refund for you!

There are many money-saving tax credits and deductions that can reduce the tax burden on families with children. The Child Tax Credit, Child Care Credit and the Earned Income Credit can all mean tax savings for families with one or more children.  Remember, a tax credit is a dollar-for-dollar reduction of the taxes you owe.
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Free H&R Block At Home Online Premium Edition – Giveaway

Have you done your taxes yet? Do you know how you will have them prepared?  Well, I’m here to help (maybe).

Our friends at H&R Block have offered up three (3) codes that can be redeemed for their H&R Block At Home Premium Edition. That means three readers will have a chance to win a copy.

A little about H&R Block At Home Online Premium Edition (from H&R Block):

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Changes on the 1040 IRS Tax Form this Year…How Does It Affect You?

It’s that time of year again! Sometime in the next few months you may be preparing, or having someone else prepare, a 1040 tax return form for 2010.  First be aware of some changes that have been made since last year, says “the tax guy” from Smart Money.

First of all, in case you haven’t heard, the deadline for filing IRS taxes is a smidgen later this year.  It will be April 18th because Emancipation Day, a holiday celebrated in Washington, D.C., falls on April 15th this year.

Your tax preparer may also file electronically this year.  Congress has passed laws that are pressuring them to e-file, and it’s safe to say this is the direction we are going as a country.  On that note, you may also have noticed that your annual year-end 1040 booklet from the IRS never showed up.  It won’t.  EverAgain.  2009 was the last year it was mailed out.  If you miss it, you can still find it at IRS.gov and at their walk-in taxpayer assistance centers or participating libraries and post offices.
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